All posts in “Jenson”

Fortress Press Kindle Sale (Barth, Moltmann, Bonhoeffer, and more)

Fortress Press is currently running their eBook sale on Amazon. Every year I have benefited tremendously from this sale and thought this year I should publish a list of some of the best titles up for grabs. Particularly notable books are marked with an asterisk (*). Enjoy!

**This sale is no longer current as of June 1, 2018. I will update for next year’s sale.**


Click here to see the full sale

Jürgen Moltmann

Primary sources:

The Crucified God — $6.99*

Collected Readings — $4.99

The Coming of God — $4.99*

The Trinity and the Kingdom — $4.99*

The Spirit of Life — $4.99*

The Way of Jesus Christ — $4.99

Ethics of Hope — $4.99

Jesus Christ for Today’s World — $4.99*

In the End—the Beginning — $4.99*

The Source of Life — $4.99

Experiences of God — $4.99

Sun of Righteousness Arise — $4.99

On Human Dignity — $4.99

The Future of Creation — $4.99

Passion for Life — $4.99

Science & Wisdom — $4.99

Secondary sources:

God Will be All in All (includes an essay from Moltmann) edited by Richard Bauckham — $4.99*

The Kingdom and the Power by Geiko Muller-Fahrenholz — $4.99

Don’t forget to check out my new book on Moltmann, Jürgen Moltmann in Plain English

 

Karl Barth

Primary sources:

The Call to Discipleship — $4.99

Karl Barth: Theologian of Freedom edited by Clifford Green (selections from Barth’s writing) — $4.99*

Secondary sources:

The Sign of the Gospel by W. Travis McMaken — $4.99*

Saving Karl Barth: Hans Urs von Balthasar’s Preoccupation by Stephen Long — $4.99

Citizenship in Heaven and on Earth: Karl Barth’s Ethics by Alexander Massmann — $6.99

A Theology of the Third Article: Karl Barth and the Spirit of the Word by Aaron T. Smith — $4.99

Resurrected God: Karl Barth’s Trinitarian Theology of Easter by John L. Drury — $4.99

Triune Eternality: God’s Relationship to Time in the Theology of Karl Barth by Daniel M. Griswold — $6.99

The Spirit of God and the Christian Life: Reconstructing Karl Barth’s Pneumatology by JinHyok Kim — $4.99

Playful, Glad, and Free: Karl Barth and a Theology of Popular Culture by Jessica DeCou — $4.99

Also check out my book on Barth, Karl Barth in Plain English

 

Thomas F. Torrance

Secondary sources:

Theology in Transposition: A Constructive Appraisal of T.F. Torrance by Myk Habets — $4.99*

Also check out my book on Torrance, T. F. Torrance in Plain English

 

N.T. Wright

Primary sources:

Paul and the Faithfulness of God — $4.99*

The New Testament and the People of God — $4.99

Jesus and the Victory of God — $4.99

The Resurrection of the Son of God — $4.99

Christian Origins and the Question of God (complete series, four volumes) — $19.96

Paul and His Recent Interpreters — $6.99

Pauline Perspectives: Essays on Paul, 1978-2013 — $4.99

The Contemporary Quest for Jesus — $4.99

 

Friedrich Schleiermacher

Primary sources:

Friedrich Schleiermacher (Making Modern Theology) (selected writings) — $4.99*

Secondary sources:

Deus Providebit: Calvin, Schleiermacher, and Barth on the Providence of God by Sung-Sup Kim — $4.99

Embodied Grace: Christ, History, and the Reign of God in Schleiermacher’s Dogmatics by Kevin M. Vander Schel — $4.99

 

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Primary sources:

Life Together and Prayerbook of the Bible — $2.99*

The Bonhoeffer Reader ed by Clifford Green and Michael DeJonge — $4.99

Discipleship — $4.99

Creation and Fall — $4.99

Ethics — $4.99*

The Collected Sermons of Dietrich Bonhoeffer — $4.99

Life Together — $4.99

Letters and Papers from Prison — $4.99*

Act and Being — $4.99

 

Rudolf Bultmann

Primary sources:

New Testament & Mythology — $4.99

Rudolf Bultmann (Making of Modern Theology) (selected writings) — $4.99

 

Making of Modern Theology Series

G.W.F. Hegel — $4.99

Gustavo Gutierrez — $4.99

Reinhold Niebuhr — $4.99

Dietrich Bonhoeffer — $4.99

 

Kathryn Tanner

Primary sources:

Economy of Grace — $4.99

Theories of Culture: A New Agenda for Theology — $4.99

Spirit in the Cities: Searching for Soul in the Urban Landscape (editor) — $4.99

Secondary sources:

The Gift of Theology: The Contribution of Kathryn Tanner ed. by Rosemary P. Carbine and P. Koster — $6.99

 

Robert W. Jenson

Primary sources:

Christian Dogmatics vol. 1 — $4.99

Christian Dogmatics vol. 2 — $4.99

Secondary sources:

Dogmatic Aesthetics: A Theology of Beauty in Dialogue with Robert W. Jenson by Stephen John Wright— $4.99

 

Dorothee Soelle

Primary sources:

The Silent Cry: Mysticism and Resistance — $4.99*

Suffering — $4.99

Theology for Skeptics — $4.99

 

Other notable books

Systematic Theology: Volume 1, the Doctrine of God by Katherine Sonderegger — $6.99*

Jesus and Nonviolence: A Third Way by Walter Wink — $4.99*

The Prophetic Imagination by Walter Brueggemann — $4.99

Disruptive Grace by Walter Bruegemann — $4.99

Texts Under Negotiation: The Bible and Postmodern Imagination by Walter Brueggemann — $4.99

Jesus’ Abba: The God Who Has Not Failed by John B. Cobb — $3.99

Douglas John Hall: Collected Works — $4.99

 

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Trinitarian Theology after Barth: a Review

Book: Trinitarian Theology after Barth (Princeton Theological Monograph) ed. by Myk Habets and Phillip Tolliday, with a foreword by John Webster (AMAZON LINK)

Publisher: Pickwick Publications (an imprint of Wipf & Stock Publishers), included in the Princeton Theological Monograph Series #148 (PUBLISHER LINK)

Overview: Like any collection of essays, there will always be those essays that hit a home run, those that intrigue great interest, and sadly sometimes also those that fall flat. In this collection there were far more home-runs and sparks of intrigue than in most of the collections I’ve read, and for that reason alone this is an excellent and thought-provoking book well worth your time. It will be of special interest for those wanting to study Barth’s Trinitarian theology, and particularly to examine the diverse streams of thought of those who have more or less followed after his work. Continue Reading…

Robert Jenson’s Alpha and Omega: a Review

Book: Alpha and Omega: A Study in the Theology of Karl Barth by Robert W. Jenson (Amazon link)

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers, 2002 (Publisher link)

Robert W. Jenson’s book, Alpha and Omega, is an excellently clear, and precise study in the theology of Karl Barth. Jenson asks how it is that the historical event of Jesus’ life might be the decisive reality of our present life, calling this question “the chief problem of modern theology.” (13) Jenson holds Barth’s theology up as a “grandiose and pioneering answer to this challenge [of modern theology].” (16)

With clarity and precision, Jenson examines some of the most difficult aspects of Barth’s thought, including Barth’s doctrine of nothingness, of creation, of election, of salvation, of history, of the incarnation, and of God. The overarching question behind these inquiries is the relationship between Jesus’ historical existence and our present lives, but along the way I found myself attending a masterclass in Barth’s doctrine of election, creation, and providence. I can’t recall reading anything nearly as erudite in secondary literature as Jenson’s presentation.

The three specific questions that Jenson asks of Barth’s theology are as follows. First, “To what end does God rule human history, and what is the course of the history of salvation?” Second, “In what sense does God have a history, and what is the relation between this history and ours? That is how does God guide human history?” Third, “What is the reality to which talk in the Church bears witness?” (17-8)

Of God’s plan for history and the mode of God’s rule in history, Jenson notes that these questions are, for Barth, never asked separately. For Barth, “The coming of Christ to sinners is absolutely determined from all eternity and is the purpose of all that happens.” And furthermore, “Christ’s life, as a movement of God’s eternal will, is itself the basis of its appearance in time.” (113) These for Barth are one of the same proposition, according to Jenson.

In other words, Jenson shows that for Barth, God’s plan for history and His rule in history are one and the same: the life of Jesus Christ. This event is the event of all history and existence, the plan God determined before creation. Jesus’ life is then, for Barth, the central event of all history and of creation. This is the core of Barth’s doctrine of election, that God determined Himself to be God for us in Jesus Christ, to be the God of sinners, to reconcile us to Himself.

The brilliance of this position is shown in how sharply it contrasts with other common presentations. Often the incarnation and salvation of Christ is portrayed as the reaction of God to human sin, placing God in a kind of “hail Mary” position in the face of evil. But Barth reverses the order. If Jesus Christ’s life is the epitome of all history, than this event precedes even the creation of the cosmos. The choice to reconcile human beings to Himself, to become man in Jesus Christ, is an eternal choice in the Triune life of God. Salvation wasn’t an afterthought, God’s coming to us in Jesus Christ was the basis for His act of creation. The difficulties in this position are apparent, but Jenson navigates them masterfully and with clarity.

To the final question, of the reality to which the church bears witness, Jenson turns to Barth’s inclusive Christology. Jenson writes of this reality: “We are what we are in Him. Our existence is ‘virtually accomplished’ in His. In that He has kept the covenant, we have kept the covenant. In that He has obeyed God, we have obeyed God. Our existence is enclosed in His from all eternity. … This history, the history of the man Jesus with God, is our real history.” (132-3)

This inclusive Christology is the reality the church proclaims. The reality of Jesus Christ, who is our obedience, our relationship with God—who is the covenant with God and all humanity—is the proclamation of the church. We proclaim: Look to Christ, here is your history, the basis for your existence as a human, this man with God is all mankind with God! “Our history is participation in Christ’s history.” (136) “Jesus Christ as God and man is the one great history of the eternal covenant between God and man[kind].” (139)

To conclude the book Jenson gives a helpful summary of Barth’s doctrine of election, followed by some final reflections on Barth’s theology. Jenson outlines many areas where he agrees with Barth, but he also offers some insightful criticisms.

Summary:

This book was surprisingly easy to read, written with a clarity often absent from many studies of Barth’s theology. The precision of this study will be of tremendous value to any student of Barth’s thought. Jenson doesn’t dance around the difficult questions, but masterfully navigates through its many challenges. Instead of walking away confused by complex jargon and paradoxical images, I left this book with a better, clearer understanding of Barth’s thought. An excellent book, one I highly recommend.

My thanks to Wipf and Stock Publishers for a digital copy of this book for review. I was under no obligation to offer a positive review, and have presented my honest reflection on this work. 

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